What Will Happen If Schools Ban Homework?

It's a change that most students have been calling for since schools first began! Recently, however, there is a growing movement on the side of the teachers that banning homework may be the way to go. An increasing number of instructors are assigning little or no homework assignments, and instead focusing their students attention on intensive, in-class study sessions.

The argument made by those who are “anti-homework” say that it increases stress, reduces the enjoyment that students can get from learning, and may actually increase drop out rates. They believe that by encouraging students (and teachers) to make more efficient use of classroom time, homework should become unnecessary.

Creative thinking, and nurturing a desire to learn in young people is the most important thing for those in the “anti-homework” camp. Sending students home every night with work to be completed in a room by themselves, interferes with the free time they need to socialize with friends and family.

It also may take time away from extracurricular activities and sports. With the rates of youth obesity a serious concern in many countries, some people are arguing that it is much more important to keep our youth active, than overworked academically.

Like the educators, parents too are split over whether or not a homework ban would be a good or a bad thing. Some families feel that homework assignments take away from “family time”, especially given that in many modern families, both parents work. This leaves very little time for a family to spend together. Also, some parents say that the competition is already so stiff to gain entrance to good schools, homework only adds to the pressure that students feel to perform.

On the other side of the table, sit those who are a part of the conventional “pro-homework pack”. When asked why they continue to assign homework, many instructors will reply that that is simply the way that it has always been done. It seems that the status quo is unlikely to change soon. These teachers believe there is simply not enough time in the classroom to get through the assigned course material. Others point the finger at the ever-increasing size of their classes, and a lack of sufficient resources and support staff.

The “no homework” debate has been going for decades, and shows no sign of being resolved anytime soon. There is little doubt that should the government ban the practice tomorrow, the sun would still rise, and the planet continue to turn. Students will always study, and work harder to improve their grades when they want to. The desire to learn is the most important factor in any student's progress.